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Support the Trails with West Michigan Michigan Mountain Biking Alliance

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We love riding. Central District Cyclery is all about mountain bikes, and the more trails we have, the better.

If variety is the spice of life, then we’ve got it made in our neck of the woods, and a lot of that is down to the hard-work of the West Michigan Mountain Bike Alliance. WMMBA and its volunteers maintain a dozen trails in area, from Hammond Hill to Yankee Springs to Luton and Merrell, they put in countless hours of work to maintain, protect, and expand trail systems in West Michigan.

All those trails and all that work adds up, and while there are plenty of trail days and work bees that offer you the chance to lend a hand, oftentimes the biggest thing you can do is join as an Ally. Adding your name to the roster lends strength to the organization, offers vital funds for things as simple as gas to as big and ambitious as the GR Bike Park!

Here at CDC, we donate $25 for every mountain bike sold at the shop. It’s just our way of helping to ensure that we all have a place to ride today, tomorrow, and for decades to come, but it’s just one part of the process. We encourage everyone who rides to join as an Ally, and stay involved with WMMBA as we build for the future!

For more information, make sure you head over to wmmba.org, where you’ll not only find out where to join, but also see the latest updates on trail conditions on the home page, check out events, and a lot more.

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Jump'n'Pump with Bob :: Sunday, September 23

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As had been noted and documented before, our head wrench, Bob Hammond, can shred. His reputation is so stellar that he’s been asked to help instruct a clinic on how to rail the pump track, and your first chance to learn from the master is this Sunday!

LIV Cycling gave Bob the ol’ ring (well, probably a text message first) to see if our guy could help offer up so pointer on jumping and pumping in the dirt. Bob is a long-time BMX and dirt jumper, in addition to being a pretty incredible downhiller, too. He was jazzed to join in, and you can get involved to learn about riding and jumping.

The clinic will go over everything from how to ride berms, smalls jumps, pump tracks, and the basics of getting airborne. No prior experience is needed, but you’re going to want to be comfortable with basic handling skills. Pop on your flat pedals and wear a helmet (duh) and we’ll work you up to being comfortable getting off the ground.

The morning session will be structured to help beginners tackle the basics, while the afternoon session will be designed to offer more experienced riders a bit more instruction for more speed, higher jumps, and the chance to push their limits that little bit further. Proceeds from both sessions will go to help the on-going GR Bike Park rebuild! The GR Bike Park is going to be THE place to use these skills once construction on the second phase, currently in progress, is completed for the season.

For updates on the both sessions, keep an eye on things here. Each session is just $10, with the event taking place this Sunday, September 23, at Rock City BMX.

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September Sale Bikes at CDC

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September is the best time to ride. Cool nights, warm afternoons, and just enough daylight to get out there, get a good ride in, and get home just as the sun goes down. The only thing that can really make this month any sweeter is a new bike!

We’ve already built-up plenty of 2019s, and that means our remaining 2017s and 2018s are taking up a bit of our floor space. We gotta move ‘em, and you gotta check ‘em out.

We have plenty more in stock, but we’ve picked a few you’re really gonna like. Looking to get out on something new but don’t want to put a semester at a state school’s worth into a new rig? Kona has two solid options for under $1,500, and both models have some new touches added for 2018 from years past. The Kona Mahuna and Kona Blast are both rock solid options that we’ve steered plenty of parents toward for kids that might be growing out of their bikes in the next few years, but still need something that’s going to hold up to some serious shredding.

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Already got a hardtail? Get some travel. The NKOTB (that’s ‘new kid on the block’) at CDC, Norco, has a couple of options ready to roll. We’re excited to get Norco’s 2019s in, but that doesn’t mean last year’s bikes are something to scoff at. The Fluid 3 and Fluid FS2+ have limited sizes available, but if these glass slippers fit, you’re going to be pretty happy. The Fluid 3 offers NX 1x11 drivetain with 29” wheels, and is designed for techy trails and big days in the saddle. The plus means more; the FS2+ offers wider tires on a 27.5” wheel for a lower center of gravity and a sturdy footprint on the loose stuff.

There’s also one of our favorite bikes of the year. The Rocky Mountain Element is an ideal trail bike for West Michigan. It’s a cross-country bike for a new era; 120mm travel up front, well-adjust RIDE 9 suspension in the back, and a feathery-light frame to make it up the steepest climbs we’ve got around GR.

You can check out our fall pricing here on the site, see what’s in stock, and ask us anything with a phone call. What bike are YOU getting this September?

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Last FUNduro of the Year, Can't Hold Anything Back

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Tomorrow night, we partake in the final Funduro of 2018. Don't miss it. 

It's hard not to get emotional, but we're going to try to get through this without tearing up. Our final Funduro from City Built Brewing rolls at at 6:30pm for one last dance. It's been a ton of fun leading these rides (and eating those tacos) all summer long, and we've met some really cool folks along the way. From weekly regulars to folks from out of town just making it for one night only, the Funduro has proven you can go fast AND meet your fellow riders. 

Remember, first place on the timed sections gets you a taco dinner, while second, third, and DFL gets you whatever random stuff we have laying around. Could it be just a rubber band? It could, but it probably won't be. It's about the ride, and the tacos, and the fun. 

We want to thank City Built for letting a bunch of bike nerds hang around all season, as well as giving us a pretty cool tour earlier this year. Here's some GREAT news; you can totally go to City Built any day of the week, with or without your bike! They've got everything from euchre to board games, trivia and more lined up all fall, so make sure you watch their events page on Facebook and keep the good tacos rolling. 

We'll see you at City Built for the last FUNduro of 2018; stay tuned for more fun as we roll into a new month and a new season at CDC. 

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Celebrate 30 Years Of Kona (Or Get A Head Start on 2019)

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Kona is ahead of the game in so many ways, but their knack for getting new bikes into boxes and then into our hands probably what we appreciate the most! Ignore the calendar, 2019 is here. 

We're expecting a nice big truck load of fun this week, including some of the most anticipated bikes of the season. While we'll still have 2017s and 2018s on sale through the end of the month, you may want to rub your dimes together for some of the newest and coolest bikes on offer here, there, or anywhere. 

Over the next few days, you're going to see the 2019 Kona Libre (which we waxed heavily on here), the Rove ST, the freshened-up Big Honzo, and the Hei Hei AL. But there's one bike you're really going to want to scramble to see, and that is one that's been 30 years in the making. 

Earlier this month, Kona unveiled (or, more accurately, UNLEASHED!) the 30th Birthday Bike! In order of three decades of sweet rides, they crafted a special edition of the Honzo ST with a snazzy mirror finish, 30th birthday saddle, and a special decal denoting which of the 201 frames made you ended up with. 

The bike is spec'd with SRAM NX1 bits, but you can go crazy thanks to the modular dropouts. There's something about the look of that thing that makes us want to go singlespeed. 

You can check out the Birthday Bike online, but man, you're going to want to see it in person. 

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HOLD THE PHONE, KONA: The Libre Is The Greatest Thing These Eyes Have Every Seen

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There's been a steady trickle of hot new rigs coming from the Kona faucet the past few weeks, but this one made us stop in our tracks. 

Kona has had two killer all road/gravel/touring set-ups for a couple of years now. The gravel grinders among us had two flavors to choose from, the relaxed Sutra and the slightly twitchier Rove. The Sutra leaned touring, the Rove leaned toward speed and perhaps a little closer to the cyclocross-centric Jake line-up. But the Rove and the Sutra shared one trait; they were metal. 

Sure, you can choose from aluminum or steel, but even the best of those can only be made so light. With other brands offering lighter options it was only a matter of time before Kona brought out an all-road carbon option. And now they have. 

The Libre, on first inspection, looks like somebody slipped a Rove into a vat of Kona Race Light carbon (we know that's not how it works) and kept all the little bits touring riders like; mounts everywhere for bottle cages, fenders, and racks, clearance for 45c tires, and a head tube that doesn't hurt your back to look at. 

With two models, the Libre and Libre DL, you've got choices, and since Kona is smart, there isn't the redundant spec overlap you see from some brands. The Libra is Shimano 105 with a 2x drivetrain and 650b WTB wheels with 47c Byways, while the DL goes SRAM Force 1 with 700c 45c WTB Riddlers. 

The bike offers perhaps Kona's most well-rounded drop bar bike yet; a platform for all your touring adventures that can also handle a race number at events like Barry-Roubaix or the Lowell 50. 

All the details on the brand new 2019 Kona Libre are available here. If you want to chat about it, get a hold of us

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I Want That: Kona's 2019 Rove Line-Up

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We've waxed dangerously close to poetic about these rigs before, but look, when the bikes are this sweet, we're not going to shut up about it. 

Kona went big by offering littler wheels in 2018; the Rove line-up's all-road reputation was bolstered with a number of models getting the 'NRB' moniker and fitted with 650 wheels that allow for more tire clearance. For the sandy, rough stuff in Michigan, that's huge; wider tires mean more two-tracks, more trails, and way more versatility, and if you're looking at a Rove, that's really what you're going for. 

Think of 2019 as tweak of 2018s, with a full 6 bikes on offer ranging from the top-of-the-line Rove LTD to the base Rove. The line-up really hits it all, with plenty of options between 1x and 2x drivetrains, aluminum and steel frames, carbon and steel forks, and 700 or 650b wheels. Odds are there's a build that suits your style, and if there isn't, you can always get the Rove Ti frameset and pick your bits part-by-part. 

Our favorite change for 2019? That's gotta be the Rove ST. The dressed-down option of the LTD, the ST gets 650b wheels for this season, but retains the springy steel fork that we just love having for big days in the saddle. It's dressed in SRAM Rival 1 and flat mount brakes, and for gravel, cyclocross, and commuting, it's one of the best values out there, especially if you're really tough on your stuff. 

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Bob's 'bolt: Our Bike Guru's Take on the Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt C30

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Here at CDC, we've got two valuable things going for us; first, we have access to some killer brands and bikes, including Rocky Mountain. Second, we've got experienced riders who really know how to put a bike through its paces. From Bryan's 188 mile SledgeHamr to Bob's shreds right here in West Michigan, we're able to ride what we like, and let you know what you need to get on. This week, Bob's much-anticipated review of the Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt. It's a longer-travel-than-you're-used-to full suspension bike that Bob made even more rowdy. See his impressions, and make sure you come check one out for yourself. 

I’ve had the pleasure to ride the 2018 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt for the past few months. I’m riding the Carbon 30 model with the NX drivetrain, RockShox Recon fork and Deluxe rear shock.

I put a 2018 Manitou Mattoc Pro 140mm travel fork on the front to slacken it out just a touch and also gave me the ability to get some time on this new product. Manitou has really stepped up their game and are giving other suspension manufacturers a run for their money. And at a pricepoint that is substantially less than most other comparable forks.

My first impression of the Thunderbolt is, on paper, everything that I’ve been looking for in a full squish bike the past 5 years. The geometry is a little slacked out in the front end for stability when hauling ass. The rear features a pretty short rear chainstay length at 426mm to make the bike quick and nimble when ducking through the trees.  Riding places like Maple Hill and the Richmond flow trail was super fun on this bike. They target this bike as an XC/trail bike, but it would be more than adequate to ride almost everywhere.

First ride
My first ride on the Thunderbolt was at the Wahlfield Trail, just north of Grand Rapids. There are quite a few spots with off cambers, technical spots swerving through trees, a small flow trail, and a lot of pedaling. The bike rode all of those things extremely well. My recommendation is to air the shock to your body weight and add 20psi for initial sag setting. It puts you at about 20-25% sag and works well for the terrain around here. I did also notice that once I started riding the bike, I never touched the lockout functions on the fork or shock. This is something that I was pretty used to doing on the other bikes I’ve ridden. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it is awesome not having to worry about hitting the lockout lever on climbs and descents.

Most full suspension Rocky Mountain bikes come with the Ride-9 linkage adjustment to fine tune the geometry. This is an awesome feature to fine tune the bike to the terrain you’re wanting to ride. It’s a feature that goes along with fine-tuning the suspension. Once we get the sag and suspension tuned, we can adjust the Ride-9 chip to tweak the geometry to better suit your riding style and the terrain you ride. That’s pretty awesome.

It’s a quick little bike through the woods, and when it's pointed downhill, it's very stable at speed. Especially for it's gemetry and travel, it still feels like a very efficient bike to pedal, no matter what speed. Pedal bob was far less than many other mid travel full suspension bikes I’ve ridden in the past. Those include the Cannondale Trigger, Scott Genius, GT Sanction, Norco Optic, and YT Jeffsy. That is probably very important to people in our area, where you're going to pedal plenty. 

Since getting the bike, I’ve taken it to most of the trails around the area including Merrell, CSA, CSGA, Yankee Springs, Maple Hill/Markin Glen 4 times, and the Richmond flow trail every Wednesday. This bike rides extremely well at all these trails. You can pedal like crazy to keep up with your Strava times or hike a bike and rip the downhill sections repeatedly, all with a smile on your face. I can’t pinpoint the one thing that I like on the bike. I think it’s the fact that you can ride any of those trails, and have a really good time. I never thought about things I’d want to change on it, other than the bars.

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CDC's Savor Summer Sale!

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Recently, we made a huge mistake. We looked at a calendar. 

Less than two months, it said. On September 22, the sun will pass the celestial equator, the earth will tilt on its axis, and things will get dark, chilly, and rainy. The Autumnal Equinox is now less than two months away, and with school a month off, summer is feeling like a rather fleeting thing. 

Look, we love fall, and honestly, winter isn't so bad, either. But right now, we really appreciate having a really long evening to ride after work, riding with bare arms and not even having to think about arm warmers or jackets, and with a dry summer, rain hasn't stopped or altered many of our ride plans. Sure, as we get closer to apple cider, Halloween, and night rides we'll be pumped about those things to, but they can take their timing getting here. 

We're trying to savor every ice cream cone, beach day, and hot, sunny bike ride we can this August, and we want to make sure you can, too. Starting right....NOW...you'll find up to 40% off select 2017 and 2018 bikes from Kona and Rocky Mountain. We want you to get the bike you've always dreamed of, then immediately ride the snot out of it while we have the warm temperatures and the daylight to do so. 

Of course, we're going to give you plenty of chances to ride it with us, too. Our weekly Wednesday night Funduro ride is on for August, so make sure you join us from City Built Brewing at 6:30. We're also cooking up another Dirt Church or two, as well as working out some final details for a Labor Day Sabbatical to a destination as yet undetermined. 

There are some sweet rigs on the floor right now, and you can see most of what's in stock right here. Make sure you stop by to everything built-up, as well as for the official sale price for each bike. 

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What Was Your First Bike?

As we were scrolling through old photos to get ready for the Suspension Clinic, we came across plenty of really cool mountain bikes from the 90s. For riders who got their start back in that glorious era, it's hilarious and yet somehow incredible to look back at the technology of that era. 

Manufacturers were just beginning to work with new materials in designs on the road side of things, and some of that quickly made the jump to what was a sport just finding its legs. Mountain biking exploded in the early 90s, and brands were eager to promise the Holy Trinity of cycling, which they still promise today; lighter, stiffer, faster bikes. And just how they did that varied wildly, and looked even more wild. 

Hard tails offered cantilever brakes and suspension forks from Rock Shox and Manitou, but those were still in their infancy. Most offered zero adjustment rubber elastamer travel, some with as little as 20mm. Many riders opted just to stick with their classic steel forks; at least those were reliable! Steel was still king, but aluminum was offered at more and more price points as the decade progressed, ultimately becoming the default material. 

Kona was just a toddler, popping up in 1988 and offering one of the wildest full suspension designs of the era. By 1998, the designers had concocted the Stinky 5, which weighed about 500 pounds, bobbed like crazy, but looked just incredible. The bike was nothing if not bold. 

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Of course the iconic design of the 90s was the Klein. The hardtail option, the Attitude, is still lust-worthy, and we know plenty of riders who still ride theirs around the neighborhood and even on the trails when the tug of nostalgia becomes a bit too much to ignore. It was the Mantra, though, that really set the tone for the outlandish era of full suspension. There's a sense that the designers of the day were really reaching for something, knew they were reaching for something, and just didn't care if it came out just off the mark. By 1999, the Mantra had reached its zenith; Specialized, Trek, and Cannondale would all have Y-bike options well entrenched, and full suspension bikes weren't a novelty anymore. 

What did change, however, were the expectations of riders. After a decade of 'dual suspension', they were less forgiving with pedal bob, blown out pivots, and bikes that weighed well over 30 pounds just to have a few measly millimeters of travel. Like anything else in the industry, the drive was on to improve the design and materials of full suspension to get us to where we are today. The craziest thing to think about is where we are now and where bikes will be in another twenty years; maybe the Mantra won't look so strange by 2040! 

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Bob's Suspension Clinic

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Outside and into the wild! If you loved our winter-long tech and suspension clinics, wait until you actually get to ride bikes at one! On July 12, we're taking the tech talk outside to help more of our customers understand their suspension. Whether you're on a hard tail or full-squish, we want to make sure your ride is dialed in. We'll go over how to make adjustments to both forks and shock, how each adjustments change your ride, and what to look for after a ride to make the right changes. 

You'll be able to hit the pump track as many times as you want, and we'll give you some points. If you're looking to really get things right, it's a great time to book your ShockWiz and suspension service so you can get more information from a longer ride at your favorite trail. 

Suspension clinic is totally free, totally laid-back, and it's going to be a lot of fun, too. 

It's also going to be a really good time to check out the new Norco line-up! We're really excited to offer some hand-picked models and specs that really suit how we like to ride here in West Michigan. Think longer travel, slacker geometries, and tough components that we know hold up really well. 

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Foil That Bike Thief: Some Tips on Stopping Bike Crime

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There has been a wave of bike thefts in Grand Rapids over the past few weeks of months. The weather is good, everyone is riding, and whether you're tossing your bikes on a rack to get the trailhead or just running inside quickly for a coffee on your way to work, the scum of the earth is always lurking. We wanted to offer just a few ideas on how to make sure your bike is as safe as possible. 

Lock It UpNo, you lock it up! I know what you're think, 'No kidding'. But what kind of lock you use can make a huge difference. A lighter cable lock is the most portable for your commute, and if you're just stopping for five minutes for a coffee or to drop off a library book, you're probably okay. Anything longer, and we'd recommend investing in a steel U-lock; and if you have both, use both. Many bike thieves use different methods for these two locks, and it's slightly less likely they'll have both, have time to use both, and can cut both without be spotted. 

Stay Where Daddy Can See You. Whenever possible, lock up your bike in view. Even if it's from a window of a co-workers' office, the break room, or through the door of the coffeeshop, having it visible means you'll be able to see anyone lingering near your bike, and other people will be able to spot suspicious activity, too. PRO TIP: If you're in a place people know you, park in the same spot every day so they might be able to notice strange activity. However, it can also be good to park your bike in different spots so a casual thief can't rely on coming back for it if they were scared off the first time. 

Add More Protection. Bike on your car rack? Yeah, that little rubber or nylon strap isn't deterring anyone. Just as many bikes are stolen off cars, so even if your rack as a locking mechanism, considering adding U-lock or cable lock to its arsenal to make it a bit more daunting. Especially if it's a trunk rack that can literally be taken off in a minute or two, you need to offer some kind of road block; trying running a lock to any tow points below the bumper using think cord to lengthen your lock. 

Register Your Bike. If someone rips of your rig, it might just be for a joy ride. Register your bike and there's a slim chance you may be reunited if the bike ever ends up in the hands of the law. 

Be Vigilant and Communicate. Watch for any suspicious behavior, keep track of who rides what, and if you see photos of stolen bikes, keep your eyes peeled and help find them. Share posts or photos of stolen bikes on social media, too; perhaps the best way to deter theft is to make it clear that ripping off someone's Kona means living a life in the shadows, with all of Grand Rapids watching for the thief to slip up. 

 

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ShockWiz: Dial It In, Everywhere

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When Quarq first announced the ShockWiz, we got pretty darn excited. When we got it, we knew we'd finally been handed a tool that's been holding back a lot of riders in the area. 

Michigan has been, for three decades, the land of the hardtail. From racing to the knee-jerk reaction of, "You just don't need full suspension here", suspension bikes weren't considered a realistic bike for the region and the terrain. To be fair, a big part of that was simply the technology; bikes in the 90s and early 2000s were finicky, ambitious, poorly design, and inventive. We give designers a TON of credit for trying to solve age-old problems like pedal bob and fine-tuned adjustments with the very limited tech and materials at their disposal. The mother of all invention is necessity, but sometimes, that results in the Y-bike. 

But things have change an awful lot, especially in the past five or six years. The quality of the shocks and forks themselves have seen huge advancements in seals, designs, fluids, and weight, and how they've been integrated into modern frames designs is really impressive. Kona, for example, offers a full-suspension set-up that accounts for everything from water bottles to sag in the frame, not just the shock itself!

With that level of precision in place, adjusting your suspension means more than ever. These days, we don't see bad full suspension bike from really any manufacturer; instead, we see bikes that were built from a box, put on the floor, and pushed out the door with the new owner without every being set-up. For a new rider or even an experienced rider that may be new to full suspension, taking the time to ask questions and begin the process of setting up the suspension, even if it's just the fork, can make all the difference in the ride quality. 

Quarq's ShockWhiz takes things from basic set-up to a professional level of accuracy. We know where to get you started out at, and then it's up to YOU to ride your favorite trails and gather information that helps us set sag, rebound, and every aspect of your suspension for any trail. Yep, any trail; the ShockWiz can recommend settings for different trails! Because Luton ain't Yankee, you know what I mean?

You can schedule your Suspension Tuning right here. We recommend scheduling your rides at a time you know you will be able to put in some miles in order to get the most out of your time with the ShockWiz. Plan to hit your two favorite trails, and if there are weekly rides or a race you're planning on trying, consider riding that trail at race pace to get the best information possible. 

Once we have the information, you'll have a great starting point for your go-to rides, and can make small adjustments as necessary at different trail systems. We know a number of riders that log their fork and shock settings after each ride, including notes on what they would have changed and what they'd run next time. We've even seen riders with a small notebook in the garage to track their settings every ride! 

You don't have to go that crazy to keep track; use the ShockWiz and then let us get you dialed in from there! 

Introducing Quarq ShockWiz it is a suspension tuning system for air-sprung mountain bikes that combines high-tech hardware with an intuitive smartphone app. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Visit the provided link below for more information.

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Ride It. Love It. Buy It.

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We are finally escaping the 00s. It took a while, but it's happening. 

For too long, mountain bikers were convinced that a hardtail 29er was the only bike for Michigan trails. Sure, we don't have 2,000 foot climbs and the accompanying descent to look forward to. But what we do have is a dozen or so trails that offer a diverse range of terrain, elevation and needs, and more and more riders are realizing that there is more out there than a hardtail with 2.25" tires. 

Don't get us wrong, hardtrails rock. But we live in a time when brands like Kona and Rocky Mountain are making bikes that suit how more and more people ride, and that isn't always in a cross-country race. Full suspension, longer travel, smaller-wheeled and wider-tired bikes open up a different riding experience that puts the focus on fun, on big days, or just going a little but further than you're used to. 

Our demo fleet is hand-picked to help you find a bike that's just a little different than the one you've always ridden. From the XC or all-day ready Kona Hei Hei, the plus-tired Big Honzo, or the longer travel Thunderbolt and Pipeline, trying something new is as simple as picking a trail and see what suspension and volume can do for. 

Maybe the best way to hop in for a demo is by joining us at Dirt Church this Sunday, June 17. We'll have coffee at the shop at 9, then bust out to Richmond to ride no later than 10:15. You put your name on any of the bikes for Sunday right by filling out the demo reservation form here

Get signed up, try something new, and take advantage of our trade-in program this summer. There's tons of time to ride, and some great places to do it, too. 

 

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WE WANT YOU! (Well, We Want Your Trade-Ins)

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It's a HOT time of year, and not just for Popsicle enthusiasts. We're all looking to get out and ride, and there are very few things quite as motivating as a fresh, shiny new bicycle, even if that bicycle has been previously loved. 

We really dig our trade-in program here at CDC, because unlike nearly everything else in the world it makes everybody happy. You've got a bike that's in good shape, with lots of life in, but a burning desire for something more; hey, that's good. We have plenty of that something more, and it even comes in different sizes. 

It's really simple. You can use BicycleBlueBook.com (which is available right here on our site) to get a good idea of what your bike is worth. Bring your bike into the store for a final, official valuation, and you'll have that value as a credit toward a brand new 2018 bike from Central District. 

And this June, we're making it even easier. We always offer a 3% cash discount on all bike purchases, but starting right now (which isn't even technically June!) you can take an additional 2% off when you go full Randy Moss and pay #straightcashhomie. That's right 5% off when you get a new bike with real money! 

There are some rules here. Your bike has to be cleaned up and tuned up; if we have to do loads of work on it, that value will be taken off your trade-in credit. We also ask that the bike is 2005 or newer, and sorry, we don't accept department store bikes or tandems. Tandems are great, but they take up twice as much room in a small shop as a normal bicycle. More DEETS here

As always, check out our list of in-stock bicycles and start drooling. Something you're interesting that's not on the list? Stop by, or give us a call and we'll track it down for you! 

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Dirt Church: Your June Schedule of Services

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We had a blast this past weekend at Maple Hills, so we're going to keep doing the Lord's Work right here in Grand Rapids. 

After a break for Memorial Day and the following weekend, you'll have two chances to join us in praising the gods of dirt, the saints of singletrack, with two new venues to give thanks and praise. First up, join us on June 10 at Wahlfield Trail. It'll work the same as we've just done for Maple Hills; meet at the shop for coffee and breakfast around 8:30, then get rolling around 9:15 to 9:30. We'll work out carpools and caravans, or you can plan to meet us at the trailhead around 10:15. 

These Dirt Church rides are a great chance to try something new, too. We have a selection of Kona and Rocky Mountain bikes to demo, but you do need to call ahead to reserve the bikes. We won't demo any unscheduled bikes on Sundays, because we're trying to keep things laid back and fun. We'll bring the bike to the trailhead for you and even get the pedals, seat height, and suspension dialed in; when you're done, we'll take care of it for you! 

Our demo fleet includes:

Kona Hei Hei
Kona Big Honzo
Kona Process 153

Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt
Rocky Mountain Pipeline

Our second Dirt Church for the month of June will come a week later. We're heading to Richmond Park on June 17, with the same free bike demos, breakfast, and more grilling while we spend the day riding! If there's a little something you'd like specifically, bring it, but we'll have the traditional barbecue fare on offer. 

Sundays are for preserving a sense of reverence, and there's no reverence quite like that of riding bikes in the woods with friends. 

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Dew You Know Bryan?

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  1. What was your first bike? 

    2017 Specialized Rockhopper Sport

  2. What is your perfect bike ride?

    Technical Singletrack, all day, 55°, light breeze, no gap jumps!

  3. If you could tell a customer one maintenance tip, what would it be?

    Wash your bike after every ride🤘

  4. What is your proudest accomplishment on the bike?

    Currently: finishing Marji Gesick 100 in ‘17

  5. If you could have any 2018 bike from the CDC line-up, what rig would you take home?

    Rocky Element 999

  6. What is your favorite trail to ride in West Michigan?

    Does Owasippe count? If not, Cannonsburg Ski Hill/ State Game Area. (Ed. Note: We'll count Owasippe.)

  7. What is your favorite place to ride in the WORLD?

    South Marquette, so far...

  8. What makes CDC different from other bike shops?

    Two things: Cranky Nate and Happy Nate.

  9. What’s the one tool/snack/item you won’t leave home without?

    Tailwind!

  10. What would you tell a new rider about getting into cycling?

    Ride, travel, ride, travel. What do you want to do? Gravel, road, singletrack? Buy a bike you gel with and ride the living hell out of it.

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Meet Bob, CDC's Service Slayer

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Have you met Bob? If you've been in the shop, you almost certainly have met our hardworking manager with an eye for detail and a passion for shredding. He's a BMX rider who never grew all the way up, and a suspension expert that can dial in your full suspension rig like no one else in town. 

1. What was your first bike?

Schwinn Predator

2. What is your perfect bike ride?

Either a stroll with my wife and son. Carving some turns in a bowl at the skate park or hitting some big delicious dirt jumps hidden in the woods

3. If you could tell a customer one maintenance tip, what would it be?

Check your tire pressure regularly.

4. What is your proudest accomplishment on the bike?

Still being able to ride after all the stupid things I’ve done on a bike so far. Still being able to ride a BMX bike as an old guy.

5. If you could have any 2018 bike from the CDC line-up, what rig would you take home?

Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt. GX spec with RockShox suspension.

6. What is your favorite trail to ride in West Michigan?

Maple Hill. Or Charlotte skate park. Undisclosed Dirt Jumps.

7. What is your favorite place to ride in the WORLD?

Haven’t been yet, but will be Whistler in July 2018. Ray's is amazing.

8. What makes CDC different from other bike shops?

We cater to the mountain bike/gravel crowd. We’re different than a lot of shops. We live and breathe dirt.

9. What’s the one tool/snack/item you won’t leave home without?

Shock pump.

10. What would you tell a new rider about getting into cycling?

Have fun and don’t take it too seriously.

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Your Month In Bike Rides

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We're cooking up some serious fun this May. Here's where you'll find us. 

Central District Cyclery is whipping out some sweet stuff this spring, including two new weekly rides, plus a road trip south to Maple Hill. 

In case you were distracted by the run of Barry-Roubaix, Yankee Springs TT, and Fort Custer, your weeknights are getting a bit more spicy, too. On Wednesdays and Thursdays, you're busy. On Wednesday, we're chasing glory and tacos with our pals at City Built Brewing with the FUNduro. Two timed segments, two transfers, and 100% chance of tacos every Wednesday at 6, rolling from City Built. 

Thursdays, we're staying at the shop with Dirty Thursdays. Some of you hood rats already joined us last week, so you'll get it. If you missed it, don't miss out again. We ride the pump track, make it bigger, weirder, and incrementally more dangerous until it's dark. Interval training, but with beer. It's also a great chance to dial in your suspension, too. 

On May 20, we're taking the show on the road to Maple Hill. We'll carpool from the shop at 9am, or you can meet us down there. Maple Hill is a new trail that was just completed in August of 2017 at Markin Glen Park, just outside of Kalamazoo. We'll do a few loops of the 5.5 mile trail, pick some downhills to shred, and throw a little shrimp on the barbie, too. 

Of course, it's also a great time to help get the trails ready for summer. WMMBA has a number of opportunities to donate a pint of elbow grease to help Luton, Cannonsburg Ski Hill Trail and Ionia Rec get all polished up for the rest of the season. Remember, we'll make a donation to WMMBA every time you buy a mountain bike from us! 

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Trade In, Trade Up at CDC

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New year, new season, new bike. 

At Central District, we like all bikes. Like most people, new ones are especially cool. There's nothing wrong with sticking by an old faithful friend who has shared some great times with you, but there's also a point where it's best to let that friend fly the coop. This spring, we're making it very easy to trade in and trade up. 

Stop by the shop for an on-the-spot quote from Bicycle Blue Book. Your trade-in gets you credit toward any bike in the shop, including other used bikes that might be bouncing around! Of course, with so many sweet 2018s from Rocky Mountain and Kona, you'll likely hop onto something shiny, 1x, and squishy. 

Make sure you join us this Sunday, May 6 for the Ultimate Demo Day at Wahlfield Trail. Our pals at Village Bike and Fitness will also be on hand, giving you a ton of options on test rides from some of our favorite brands. Bring your bike and we'll give you a trade-in quote while you're testing riding, so you know you've got a bit of credit already leaning toward your new bike. 

Rocky Mountain will have these bikes:

2018 THUNDERBOLT C70
2018 ALTITUDE C70
2018 INSTINCT C70
2018 PIPELINE C70
2018 ELEMENT C70
2018 SLAYER C70
REAPER 24, and more!

Kona's Demo Fleet for Sunday includes:

Process 153 AL/DL 29
Process 153 CR 27.5
Satori DL
Hei Hei Trail CR
Honzo AL/DL

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