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Kona

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September Sale Bikes at CDC

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September is the best time to ride. Cool nights, warm afternoons, and just enough daylight to get out there, get a good ride in, and get home just as the sun goes down. The only thing that can really make this month any sweeter is a new bike!

We’ve already built-up plenty of 2019s, and that means our remaining 2017s and 2018s are taking up a bit of our floor space. We gotta move ‘em, and you gotta check ‘em out.

We have plenty more in stock, but we’ve picked a few you’re really gonna like. Looking to get out on something new but don’t want to put a semester at a state school’s worth into a new rig? Kona has two solid options for under $1,500, and both models have some new touches added for 2018 from years past. The Kona Mahuna and Kona Blast are both rock solid options that we’ve steered plenty of parents toward for kids that might be growing out of their bikes in the next few years, but still need something that’s going to hold up to some serious shredding.

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Already got a hardtail? Get some travel. The NKOTB (that’s ‘new kid on the block’) at CDC, Norco, has a couple of options ready to roll. We’re excited to get Norco’s 2019s in, but that doesn’t mean last year’s bikes are something to scoff at. The Fluid 3 and Fluid FS2+ have limited sizes available, but if these glass slippers fit, you’re going to be pretty happy. The Fluid 3 offers NX 1x11 drivetain with 29” wheels, and is designed for techy trails and big days in the saddle. The plus means more; the FS2+ offers wider tires on a 27.5” wheel for a lower center of gravity and a sturdy footprint on the loose stuff.

There’s also one of our favorite bikes of the year. The Rocky Mountain Element is an ideal trail bike for West Michigan. It’s a cross-country bike for a new era; 120mm travel up front, well-adjust RIDE 9 suspension in the back, and a feathery-light frame to make it up the steepest climbs we’ve got around GR.

You can check out our fall pricing here on the site, see what’s in stock, and ask us anything with a phone call. What bike are YOU getting this September?

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Celebrate 30 Years Of Kona (Or Get A Head Start on 2019)

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Kona is ahead of the game in so many ways, but their knack for getting new bikes into boxes and then into our hands probably what we appreciate the most! Ignore the calendar, 2019 is here. 

We're expecting a nice big truck load of fun this week, including some of the most anticipated bikes of the season. While we'll still have 2017s and 2018s on sale through the end of the month, you may want to rub your dimes together for some of the newest and coolest bikes on offer here, there, or anywhere. 

Over the next few days, you're going to see the 2019 Kona Libre (which we waxed heavily on here), the Rove ST, the freshened-up Big Honzo, and the Hei Hei AL. But there's one bike you're really going to want to scramble to see, and that is one that's been 30 years in the making. 

Earlier this month, Kona unveiled (or, more accurately, UNLEASHED!) the 30th Birthday Bike! In order of three decades of sweet rides, they crafted a special edition of the Honzo ST with a snazzy mirror finish, 30th birthday saddle, and a special decal denoting which of the 201 frames made you ended up with. 

The bike is spec'd with SRAM NX1 bits, but you can go crazy thanks to the modular dropouts. There's something about the look of that thing that makes us want to go singlespeed. 

You can check out the Birthday Bike online, but man, you're going to want to see it in person. 

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I Want That: Kona's 2019 Rove Line-Up

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We've waxed dangerously close to poetic about these rigs before, but look, when the bikes are this sweet, we're not going to shut up about it. 

Kona went big by offering littler wheels in 2018; the Rove line-up's all-road reputation was bolstered with a number of models getting the 'NRB' moniker and fitted with 650 wheels that allow for more tire clearance. For the sandy, rough stuff in Michigan, that's huge; wider tires mean more two-tracks, more trails, and way more versatility, and if you're looking at a Rove, that's really what you're going for. 

Think of 2019 as tweak of 2018s, with a full 6 bikes on offer ranging from the top-of-the-line Rove LTD to the base Rove. The line-up really hits it all, with plenty of options between 1x and 2x drivetrains, aluminum and steel frames, carbon and steel forks, and 700 or 650b wheels. Odds are there's a build that suits your style, and if there isn't, you can always get the Rove Ti frameset and pick your bits part-by-part. 

Our favorite change for 2019? That's gotta be the Rove ST. The dressed-down option of the LTD, the ST gets 650b wheels for this season, but retains the springy steel fork that we just love having for big days in the saddle. It's dressed in SRAM Rival 1 and flat mount brakes, and for gravel, cyclocross, and commuting, it's one of the best values out there, especially if you're really tough on your stuff. 

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CDC's Savor Summer Sale!

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Recently, we made a huge mistake. We looked at a calendar. 

Less than two months, it said. On September 22, the sun will pass the celestial equator, the earth will tilt on its axis, and things will get dark, chilly, and rainy. The Autumnal Equinox is now less than two months away, and with school a month off, summer is feeling like a rather fleeting thing. 

Look, we love fall, and honestly, winter isn't so bad, either. But right now, we really appreciate having a really long evening to ride after work, riding with bare arms and not even having to think about arm warmers or jackets, and with a dry summer, rain hasn't stopped or altered many of our ride plans. Sure, as we get closer to apple cider, Halloween, and night rides we'll be pumped about those things to, but they can take their timing getting here. 

We're trying to savor every ice cream cone, beach day, and hot, sunny bike ride we can this August, and we want to make sure you can, too. Starting right....NOW...you'll find up to 40% off select 2017 and 2018 bikes from Kona and Rocky Mountain. We want you to get the bike you've always dreamed of, then immediately ride the snot out of it while we have the warm temperatures and the daylight to do so. 

Of course, we're going to give you plenty of chances to ride it with us, too. Our weekly Wednesday night Funduro ride is on for August, so make sure you join us from City Built Brewing at 6:30. We're also cooking up another Dirt Church or two, as well as working out some final details for a Labor Day Sabbatical to a destination as yet undetermined. 

There are some sweet rigs on the floor right now, and you can see most of what's in stock right here. Make sure you stop by to everything built-up, as well as for the official sale price for each bike. 

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What Was Your First Bike?

As we were scrolling through old photos to get ready for the Suspension Clinic, we came across plenty of really cool mountain bikes from the 90s. For riders who got their start back in that glorious era, it's hilarious and yet somehow incredible to look back at the technology of that era. 

Manufacturers were just beginning to work with new materials in designs on the road side of things, and some of that quickly made the jump to what was a sport just finding its legs. Mountain biking exploded in the early 90s, and brands were eager to promise the Holy Trinity of cycling, which they still promise today; lighter, stiffer, faster bikes. And just how they did that varied wildly, and looked even more wild. 

Hard tails offered cantilever brakes and suspension forks from Rock Shox and Manitou, but those were still in their infancy. Most offered zero adjustment rubber elastamer travel, some with as little as 20mm. Many riders opted just to stick with their classic steel forks; at least those were reliable! Steel was still king, but aluminum was offered at more and more price points as the decade progressed, ultimately becoming the default material. 

Kona was just a toddler, popping up in 1988 and offering one of the wildest full suspension designs of the era. By 1998, the designers had concocted the Stinky 5, which weighed about 500 pounds, bobbed like crazy, but looked just incredible. The bike was nothing if not bold. 

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Of course the iconic design of the 90s was the Klein. The hardtail option, the Attitude, is still lust-worthy, and we know plenty of riders who still ride theirs around the neighborhood and even on the trails when the tug of nostalgia becomes a bit too much to ignore. It was the Mantra, though, that really set the tone for the outlandish era of full suspension. There's a sense that the designers of the day were really reaching for something, knew they were reaching for something, and just didn't care if it came out just off the mark. By 1999, the Mantra had reached its zenith; Specialized, Trek, and Cannondale would all have Y-bike options well entrenched, and full suspension bikes weren't a novelty anymore. 

What did change, however, were the expectations of riders. After a decade of 'dual suspension', they were less forgiving with pedal bob, blown out pivots, and bikes that weighed well over 30 pounds just to have a few measly millimeters of travel. Like anything else in the industry, the drive was on to improve the design and materials of full suspension to get us to where we are today. The craziest thing to think about is where we are now and where bikes will be in another twenty years; maybe the Mantra won't look so strange by 2040! 

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Trade In, Trade Up at CDC

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New year, new season, new bike. 

At Central District, we like all bikes. Like most people, new ones are especially cool. There's nothing wrong with sticking by an old faithful friend who has shared some great times with you, but there's also a point where it's best to let that friend fly the coop. This spring, we're making it very easy to trade in and trade up. 

Stop by the shop for an on-the-spot quote from Bicycle Blue Book. Your trade-in gets you credit toward any bike in the shop, including other used bikes that might be bouncing around! Of course, with so many sweet 2018s from Rocky Mountain and Kona, you'll likely hop onto something shiny, 1x, and squishy. 

Make sure you join us this Sunday, May 6 for the Ultimate Demo Day at Wahlfield Trail. Our pals at Village Bike and Fitness will also be on hand, giving you a ton of options on test rides from some of our favorite brands. Bring your bike and we'll give you a trade-in quote while you're testing riding, so you know you've got a bit of credit already leaning toward your new bike. 

Rocky Mountain will have these bikes:

2018 THUNDERBOLT C70
2018 ALTITUDE C70
2018 INSTINCT C70
2018 PIPELINE C70
2018 ELEMENT C70
2018 SLAYER C70
REAPER 24, and more!

Kona's Demo Fleet for Sunday includes:

Process 153 AL/DL 29
Process 153 CR 27.5
Satori DL
Hei Hei Trail CR
Honzo AL/DL

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My Kona: Wes' Kona Big Unit

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We're looking forward to spring, and some of us slightly more than others. Folks with new bikes, or bikes that have been built up as something new, are especially antsy. Wes' Kona Big Unit has him jonesing to shred, with a utilitarian build that's tough enough for a big season. 

The 2016 Kona Big Unit began as a frame and built up as a singlespeed. Heading into 2018, the bike is going to be the everyday shredder, race winner, and trail crusher for Wes. Because he travels a lot for work, the bike needs to be very easy to maintain, tough as nails, and be suited for any number of trail systems. 

The frame itself is a rarity these days, and hasn't been in production since 2016. It's made of 6069 scandium, which offers a springy steel ride but at a much lighter weight than even aluminum. The frame also spearheaded the now nearly universal sliding rear drop out that has swept the industry, making it easier to adjust your wheelbase to how you ride, as well as switch between singlespeed and gears. That choice is an easy one to make now, because it takes about 30 minutes to switch back and forth once you get the hang of doing it. 

Another big choice was to stick with the fully rigid Whisky fork. It takes off a bit of weight, sure, but with little maintenance or adjustment, it's also a bit of a time saver for a rider who admittedly puts his bikes away wet, mud, and quickly. 

That utilitarian theme extends to the drivetrain, where he's opted for 1x10 components with a tight 11-36 cassette. Putting in big miles means he'll through anywhere from four to six chains this summer, and 10 speed components add up to a lot of savings. He's gone with a SRAM GX groupset, paired with a 34t Wolf Tooth Oval chainring up front. There appears to be just a bit more room for a bigger ring, which may prove useful later in the season and in any potential gravel races. 

After a few years on ESI grips, he's back on ODI grips, a Prologo Novo saddle, Shimano SPD pedals, and RaceFace seatpost and bar. He's switching to an Easton 90mm -17 degree stem to lower the front end. 

The wheels are Stan's Crest with Schwalbe Racing Ralphs in a 2.25 front and rear. 

This bike weighs in at 23.1 pounds, not the lightest the world, but there's some weight to be shed from the crank when the need arises. 

What's your Kona story? Let us know about your bike, it's history, and why you love it and we can feature it on the site! Contact ilikefatbikes@gmail.com with your Kona photos and tall tales. 

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All I Want For Christmas Are These Half Dozen Things: A CDC Christmas List

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It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and that means our list of cycling needs and wants gets a little longer...and a little bit more visible to ensure they all get checked off the list. Here's our in-house blogger/cyclist/bike nerd, Cody Sovis, wish list for December. 

1. Kona Rove NRB DL. It may not be completely realistic to stick a new bike right at the top of the list, but I'm going to do it anyway. The Kona Rove NRB DL makes this list for a couple of reasons. First, I really do think this bike is the best value out there right now; for $2k, you've got an all-day road bike that, with another wheelset, can hop in a crit or do 100 miles. The stock wheels are 650b do-anythings that cover your bases for gravel, pavement, and a splash of trail. The WTB Horizons might be perfect for the new 100 mile gravel races in West Michigan next spring, namely Lowell's 100 mile option and the Psycho Killer and Barry-Roubaix. 

Secondly, this whole line up of bikes just makes more sense for how we ride today. There aren't many road or crit races left, and odds are that you already have a bike for those. I really can't imagine buying a drop bar bike that doesn't fit at least 40c tires on 700c wheels, or 2.1" tires on 650b MTB wheels. For the gravel, adventure, commute and majority of riding, having the flexibility to swap between two sets of wheels and invest more in a single bike with a nicer drive train simply makes sense. That's why I'd secretly love to nab the steel 'bling ship' version of the Rove, the LTD

2. WTB Byway 47c. Right along with the Kona Rove, the Byway is a tire that blurs a lot of lines. Mounted to 650b wheels, it's a slick tire with just enough bite to be a capable and trusty rubber for tying in more trails to your normal gravel route. Especially for folks who love to ride to the ride, it's fast on the pavement and still a blast to toss around at Cannonsburg or other singletrack systems that aren't too rocky. 

3. Serfas TSL-1200. Alright, full disclosure, I already have one of these. It's on here because it's been one of the best investments I've made for night riding, especially during cold and snowy fat bike rides. The external battery packs last longer than a single unit light/battery combo not just because they have more juice; being able to keep that battery warm in a frame bag or jersey pocket makes a huge difference. I leave my light on the bars and the pack in the frame bag almost all season, just grabbing the pack to charge up. Even on the coldest days, I can get 1.5-2 hours or two rides on a single charge at the second highest setting. 

That external pack also has some other good uses. It has a USB port, so you can charge your bike computer, phone, even your camera. I use it for traveling a lot, especially to bike races where I may not be in my car before, during or after the race and want to keep my phone with me. For big rides, such as my five hour epics during the #Festive500 during the holidays, I'll usually plug my phone in to make sure I can listen to my tune and make an emergency call for a ride home, should worst come to worst. 

3. Winter Rush Registration. This would be a great thing to unwrap! Get your fat bike friend all signed up for a fat bike race this winter and keep them motivated to put some miles in even in some colder weather. There are dozens of fat bike races and rides all over the state, and even across the Midwest with the Great Lakes Fat Bike Series. Of course, we're a bit partial to Winter Rush, which will include a race at Big M on January 13, plus the USA Cycling Fat Bike National Championship at Cannonsburg in February. 

4. Velocity Aileron US Build. You can never, ever, ever have too many wheels. I've had a ton of luck with the Velocity Ailerons, but I've never gotten my mitts on a USA build. It's about as American as you can get, with Aileron rims laced up to Industry 9 hubs. Tough, light, and they set-up tubeless exceptionally well. 

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5. Snacks. Seriously. I go through a ton of Hammer Fizz in a week, and nothing would jingle my bells like getting a pack of grape Fizz that would have be set for a few months. Having a few gels, bars, or bloks on hand are always nice, and if you've got a cyclist with a special favorite, grab 'em a box. You'll totally make their day. 

6. A Get Out Of Jail Free Card. This one doesn't cost you a dime. Give your cycling spouse or pal one coupon to let them skip something in favor of a ride. It could be dinner with the in-laws, watching a romantic comedy, or a visit to your Aunt Mertyle's. Here's the thing about this card, though; you don't get to hang it over their heads after they use it! 

7. A Tune-Up. Especially once the snow flies, it's a great time to get your road, gravel or mountain bike in the shop for a well-deserved overhaul. CDC is offering 20% off all parts and labor, so if you book your big tune now with a gift card in that amount, it'll still be a surprise under the tree that will make them happy all spring long. 

What are you hoping for this Christmas? Let us know in the comments and we'll make sure we get it in stock! 

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What Is Road Plus?

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You might have heard the term before, but what does it really mean?

Well, it's a different way of looking at and building a road bike. It's really almost crazy to think that it was only four or five years ago that that only option for a road bike was either a heavy and slow touring bike and super-light, aggressive road bike with 23c tires. That's changed, and with good reason. Most cyclists don't race criteriums, or road races, and would rather trade extreme lightweight and aerodynamics for more comfort and bigger tires. Road plus is the next step in the slow move to offerings bike that do more things well (pavement, gravel, trails, touring, etc.) rather than one thing perfectly (win bunch sprints). 

First, more and more bikes have fork and frame clearance to fit 28, 30, or even 32c tires in what we'd consider a traditional 'road' frame. The emergence of gravel bikes, which are a hybrid of road and cyclocross bikes, have wide tire clearance and a longer, road geometry. Bikes of that ilk can fit up to 40c or even 42c tires, plenty of floatation for even Michigan's sandy gravel roads and two tracks. 

But for riders looking to really open up all trails, roads, and adventures, road plus goes even further. The idea is to replace the 700 wheel with a mountain bike style 650b wheelsize, which has a small diameter. Pair that with a 47c or wider tire, and you've turned a road or gravel bike into a rigid mountain bike. Companies are starting to offer new bikes with these wheelsets stock, like the Kona Rova NRB. Many riders have opted to run the WTB Horizon or Byway 47c, which offers nearly twice the width of a traditional road wheel, but a slick center tread that reduces rolling resistance. 

The question you hear most often isn't about the actual numbers, though. People are less likely to ask what it is as they are who the wheel size is for. Well, we think it's for most people. Unless you're doing fast group rides and races all the time, the flexibility of the 47c tire means you get a lot more out of one bike. The perfect set-up might be to have a set of road tires on traditional road wheels for hopping into a big grand fondo or Grattan, and riding your 'mountain' wheels for training, trails, gravel, and every day. They're wheels for gravel grinders, bike packers, commuters...really anyone that doesn't care about winning the town line sprint on Tuesday nights. 

You can check out the Kona Rove line-up here, with all Road Plus bikes denoted by the NRB tag. Kona won't say officially what NRB, but they do say it isn't necessarily 'New Road Bike'...we'll leave you to guess. 

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Checking In On The Kona Cyclocross Crew

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It's October, and cyclocross season is in full swing not just in Grand Rapids, but all over the US and Europe! 

Kona put the new 2018 Super Jake under two of their most experienced and tough riders, the legendary Helen Wyman and Kerry Werner. The two American World Cups were the high points of September and were big targets for Kona riders. After strong rides, Kerry turned his attention to KMC 'Crit' Fest in Connecticut, while Wyman went across the Atlantic to do what she does best; battle the Belgians on their home turf. 

Helen is doing a very cool series of one-minute videos at her races, which are definitely worth checking out and following on Vimeo.  She gave the new Super Jake its first European podium at Neerpelt in Holland this past weekend, too! 

If that's got you jonesing for some cyclocross action, there's plenty to be had right here in Grand Rapids. The Beer City Growler is the second of the Michigan CX Series on Saturday, October 7, right at Wilcox Park. With a bit of rain in the forecast, it might be a truly Belgian experience for everyone, with the promise of mud, beer, and a lot of fun! 

Sunday, Kisscross is back in action for the second race of the season, this time at Highland Park. Many racers will be taking on both days, with the famous flyover expected to feature at both races. With plenty more racing to come this season, as well as other big tests like Peak2Peak at Crystal Mountain, the Lowell 50, and of course the Iceman Cometh, a double-header weekend is great preparation for the rest of your fall campaign! 

Make sure your bike is in perfect shape, even if you aren't, by getting it in for a tune-up this week, and we'll see you in the mud this Saturday and Sunday! 

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Dropper Posts And YOU!

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As you stroll casually through Central District Cyclery, you're going to notice plenty of dropper posts. Once a rarity, dropper posts are popping up on stock builds from brands like Kona because of the way they change how people ride. 

Dismissed as enduro-only, the technology has become almost standard on mountain bikes ranging from dedicated cross-country to most trail bikes. Using either a mechanical cable or hydraulic line, the dropper post gets your set out of the way in a number of situations. 

The most obvious use of a dropper will be on steep descents. Getting your seat out of the way allows you to get way, way back and hold more traction. Especially on rough, loose, or rooty downhills, you'll also avoid getting rammed by the seat, pushing your weight forward and generally scaring the crap out of you. 

But droppers are also useful in turns. Fast, flowing trails can allow you to drop the seat and drop your center of gravity. The lower, the better, and the more traction! Getting used to doing this can take a bit of practice, but once you've got it dialed, it can make your singletrack skills much stronger. 

There are some other benefits, too. We've had some folks looking for dropper posts for transportation. You can drop the post in order to fit in your car, without having to use a tool and tape measure to get it back to the right height. We've also put dropper posts on bike belonging to older riders who find balancing at stop signs or getting off the bike difficult for their hips, knees or ankles. Dropping the seat gets it out of the way and safer to mount and dismount. 

Stop by Central District and hop on a bike with a dropper to get a feel for how much it changes your riding style. You'll find it on a number of Konas, including the Big Honzo! 

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Kona Opens Up The All-Road Rove For 2018

We're all about bikes that open up new ways, places, and options to ride. The much-loved Kona Rove has already built a cult following around the go-anywhere, do-anything platform. It's no surprise that we were pretty darn pumped when we saw the full Rove offering for 2018! 

There are now NINE options on the Kona Rove, making it easier than ever to select the build specifications for how you ride. The Rove used to provide a different spec compared to the race-oriented Private Jake. With the PJ on hiatus (we'll miss you) the Rove gets to open up its offerings to include a more 1x and 2x builds, plus a whole new wheel size. 

First, the Rove starts at just $850 for the aluminum, Shimano Claris rig with 700 wheels. There's no better way to get onto a do-it-all drop bar bike, and one that is truly ideal for commuters. The next big jump is to the Rove ST, the classic steel frame option that we absolutely fell in love with. That boasts the ease of a Rival 1x drivetrain and essential offer a Private Jake build on a steel frame, with very similar geometry.

Here's the real jump. For 2018, Kona went all in on all-road, offering up Road Plus options utilizing WTB's 27.5" wheels and Horizon 47c tires. The wheel size allows for wide tires that can handle singletrack, loose sandy roads, and massive days of exploration. Especially in Michigan, this wide footprint makes a big difference, especially for linking together gravel and trails by pavement without feeling sluggish.

Kona offers three Roves with Plus Road wheels out of the bikes, starting with the Rove NRB. The Rove NRB DL gets you into Shimano 105 and, for our vote, is the best bang for your buck of the whole enchilada for $2099. The blingship of the line-up , however, is the Rove LTD. It's Reynolds 853 steel, Force 1 drivetrain and WTB's KOM carbon wheels in the 27.5" size as well. 

You're going to see more and more of the Rove and all of Kona's 2018 in the shop, so make sure you swing by! Watch our Facebook and Instagram to see what else we're building up. 

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It's Like Christmas In July! But In August!

2018 is here! One of those fun things in the bike world is the slow release of the next model year bikes well, well before the calendar reflects said model year. And for a long, long, long time that meant seeing the new stuff and then losing sleep over actually getting it until January, or February, or maybe March, who knows. It physically hurt. Seriously. 

Well, no more. Kona made a change, and it's a change that makes so much sense you'd get a $5 bill back. Here's the million dollar idea; you don't see the new stuff...until you can actually get the new stuff. Yeah. Crazy, huh? 

That means you'll be seeing all the 2018 models popping up on The Cog as they're ready to ship. To make sure you don't miss anything, we'll be relaying the unveils and announcements via our social media. We've already seen the new Sutra and two (2) Unit options out. We're expecting to see more Rove, Jake, and Wozo options coming down that long and glorious pipe very soon, too. 

That Unit? Well, in addition to the famous singlespeed, Kona is offering a SRAM NX geared version. It's the flipside of the "Well, if I get a singlespeed Unit I can add gears"; now, you can start with a bomb-proof drivetrain and go SS whenever you want to/need to. For the people into frame color, it also gives you at least consider the choice to grab black or red and get what you're into. 

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Making Room For 2018: Closeout and Demo Sale!

It's 2018 already! New models are shipping right now, and we've got give the new arrivals a bit of elbow room heading into a busy August and autumn. That's pretty rad news for you; it means we have a number of closeouts on Rocky Mountain, plus a few lingering demo Konas including the impossible-to-find Hei Hei! 

Rocky Mountain closeouts include some of our favorite bikes, including the Thunderbolt 730, a race-ready full suspension rig that's still plenty of fun, too. Don't miss the Growler, either; it's one of our favorite plus bikes out there. For more on each of these models, get a hold of us or check out Rocky Mountain's site to compare and contrast. 

2016 Instinct 950 $1,700.00

2016 Thunderbolt 730 L $1,400.00

2017 Thunderbolt 710 M $1,600.00

2017 Thunderbolt 730 M $1,800.00

2017 Thunderbolt 730 S $1,800.00

2017 Growler 730 S $700.00

2017 Growler 740 S $900.00

2017 Soul 700 M $450.00

2017 Soul 710 S $500.00

2017 Soul 700 S $450.00

2017 Soul 710 S $500.00

2017 Soul 700 S $450.00

2017 Soul 700 M $450.00

2017 vertex 930 M $1,100.00

2017 Vertex 950 M $1,300.00

2017 Vertex 950 L $1,300.00

2017 Instinct 930 msl L $2,600.00

2017 Instinct 950 XL $2,000.00

2017 Instinct 950 XL $2,000.00

All Konas Are Demos!

2017 Big KahunaKona M $999.00

2017 Big KahunaKona L $999.00

2017 Big KahunaKona XL $999.00

2017 Jake the SnakeKona 51 Green $1,100.00

2017 Private JakeKona54/Pink$1,500.00

2016 HeiHeiKona LG $1,600.00

2016 HeiHEiKona M $1,600.00

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5,000 Miles with My Kona Private Jake

If I had to, absolutely had to pick just one bike, it would be a bit of no brainer. Sure, I don't want to have just one bike, and n+1 states quite simply that you always need another. But hypothetically, a cyclocross bike is tough to top, and an easy bike to rack up the miles with. 

My Kona has taken on everything from the Barry-Roubaix gravel road race, a massive pre-ride of the Cherry-Roubaix road race, an Iceman Cometh Out and Back ride, and is used almost daily as my commuter. The Private Jake is a workhorse; aluminum frame, carbon fork, the simplicity of a single chain ring, and a proven track record over the last 5,000 miles of being pretty tough to stop. 

It's a bike that's been beaten and put away bloody. It's been crashed, tipped over, thrown over singletrack and saturated with rain and snow and slush so many times that riding it in dry weather seems to short-change the experience a bit. It's simply been a bomb-proof bike, and has reinforced my conviction that everyone should have a cyclocross bike in their quiver for gravel, bad weather, and the ability to go out and do it all. 

Maybe my favorite ride ever on the Private Jake was at The Divide Race last year. They call it a gravel race, but that's only part of the story. There are plenty of sections that barely qualify as two-track, with washed out sections and sand pits and some steep, loose climbs that I'd love to see cars actually try to drive. In other words, it's the perfect course for a burly bike with wide knobbies and a smart, simple gear ratio. Up and down, and even through those annoying, soul-crushing sandpits, the bike just flew. It was a beautiful day on the perfect bike, and one of the best days I've ever had on two wheels. 

As my bike rolls past the 5,000 mile mark, I really can't wait to see what else it can do. My goal is to finally give this bike a chance at its first Iceman Cometh Challenge, with a warm-up for the big day at the Peak2Peak race at Crystal Mountain a few weeks before. This bike deserves to get a shot at all of the races and rides we love doing in Michigan, and it's certainly up for it. 

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Rocky Mountain and Demo Bikes Sale Starts Tuesday!

The Tuesday after Memorial Day Weekend can be a bit of a buzzkill. After three days of fun in the sun (on a bike), it's back to the grind. Well we've got a few things to make it a TON better.  First, all Rocky Mountain bikes are 15% off! But that ain't it. We're trimming our demo fleet, which means you get a SWEET deal on 2015, 2016 and 2017 demo bikes. 

Get yourself up to 40% off retail on hot demo rigs from Kona and Rocky Mountain. You already know how much we DIG the Hei Hei  and you can grab one for a nice deal. These bikes are in great shape and are carefully tuned-up to make sure it'll feel like new, even if they aren't actually new. 

Below is a list of the bikes up for grabs. Stop by to check the bikes out for yourself! 

2015 Kona Hei Hei. 18"

2016 Kona Hei Hei. M

2016 Kona Hei Hei L

2017. Rocky Mountain Blizzard-10. L

2016 Rocky Mountain Altitude 930 L

2016. Rocky Mountain Instinct 930 M

2016 Rocky Mountain Instinct 950 M

2016 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 920 L

15% off ALL Rocky Mountain bikes, and up to 40% off on demos....Tuesday is going to be a darn good day! And yep, we're closed Monday to go shred, too! 

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The Kona Hei Hei Line Up Is Ready To Roll!

It's the time of year where we've got some good miles in and the big one-day adventures are calling! Ready for your biggest day on a mountain bike yet? The Hei Hei gives you the forgiveness you need for rockin' day in the woods. 

Kona does a tremendous job with the Hei Hei line-up, and every year they seem to tweak the spec to make sure there's a Hei Hei for every type of rider. From aluminum to carbon, race-ready to trail-tough, they always mix things up to the point there's an almost hand-picked parts list coming stock on their model choices. 2017 is no different, and with a slew of 100 mile races and weekend rides coming up, it's a great time to take a closer look. 

The base level Hei Hei is all aluminum and features 100mm/120mm travel, perfect for West Michigan. The spec is solid, with a Race Face Aeffect crank and Shimano XT 1x11. It's a bike that really balances race and trail geometry without feeling like it comes up short on either end. 

From there, things get carbon, and there are no fewer than four build specs to choose from. The 'Race' options forgo the dropper post for a lighter option, with the Supreme builds cranking it way past 11 to 12 speed SRAM Eagle. The Hei Hei DL is the best bet for Shimano lovers, coming with XT 1x11 and a Fox Float 34 fork paired with a Float Premium shock. We think this is a great bike for around Grand Rapids, especially if you do more than a few Quadfectas throughout the season. 

Plus, that green is so, so cool. 

For us, the top of the line is the Supreme. It keeps the same 120mm travel fork, but in the shape of the Rock Shox RS-1. Internally routed dropper, WTB's sick Ci31 rims, SRAM Eagle 12 speed in *GOLD*, all on the FUSE suspension platform that's stiff but playful. It's a dream bike, for sure, but after seeing these in person, you really appreciate how much things have changed since the Hei Hei first came out as Merlin titanium, fully rigid 26" rig with canti brakes.

 

 

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Kona Honzo AL: Shred-Ready For Under $2k

You know, you can get a heckuva bike these days for less than a 1998 Subura Legacy Outback. That's a pretty incredible value! 

We're taking a look at the 2017 Kona Honzo AL, the bike that opens up the Honzo line. With the addition of the carbon frames and high-end race specs, it would be easy to skimp on the aluminum options, but Kona always keeps every type of rider in mind. Nothing gets overlooked in the line-up, and certainly not the AL. At $1599, it's tough to beat the value and ride quality of this hot bike. 

That 'AL' is the 6061 aluminum frame you'll find on most of the range, with 29" wheels that rock for most Michigan trails. As Kona mentions, it's a more aggressive, trail-ready geometry than more traditional XC platforms, and the rubber is picked to match. The rig comes with a full 2.4" Maxxis Ardent up front and a 2.25" out back on WTB SX25 rims. 

Kona is totally dedicated to 1x drivetrains, and they sneak a SRAM NX1 setup on at a very competitive price point. Another nice spec is the RaceFace Ride crankset, which has a 32t ring on for now. That's a decent size for most riders, although some may opt to bump up to a 34t for flatter, faster races with less singletrack. (Iceman. We mean for Iceman.) 

There are two other things worth mentioning. The world, it seems, is drifting towards longer travel, and the 120mm RockShox Recon Silver certainly is heading in that direction. With the geometry of the frame (think short stays, long top tube, slacker headtube, and short stem) you're in a good position to make the most of that extra cushion, especially in singletrack. 

Of course, there's the dropper. Once you ride one, you'll get it. To see a KS mechanical dropper at this price point is awesome, and gives riders a chance to improve their descending and bike-handling. It's internally routed, keeps the lines clean, and looks incredible, too. 

We've got just a few of these left in the shop, so swing through and check out the Honzo AL and the rest of the Honzo line-up. 

 

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Our Dream Bike For Paris-Roubaix...

A few weeks ago, as the attentions of the cycling world turned to the hellingen of Flanders and then the legendary pave of Northern France, we mused of the potential of a Kona WorldTour team. Of course, that's not exactly the goal or vibe of the company, although more than a few people pointed out that, like the fun-loving Peter Sagan, professionally roadies could do with a bit more laid-back personalities at the upper level of the sport. 

So if we'll never truly know what a Kona Bicycle Co. WorldTour team would look like, we began to assemble (in our heads, at least) what their bike would be. What would Kona-CDC ride in the cobbled Classics? Let's imagine...

For the frame, we're bringing back the look, feel and performance of classic steel with the Roadhouse. With all the suspension, jelly 'serts, and wild frame designs many bike companies are cobbling (hope you caught that) together, and with their bike weights nearing the 18 and 19 pound range with all of those do-hickeys, why not just use steel? Reynolds 853 is relatively light and provides a buttery smooth ride over rough surfaces. Even the slightly taller head tube lends itself to a more endurance geometry. 


Wheels
Now, let's get dreaming. Discs are totally legal, and our frame is setup to make the most of it. With so many killer options, you'll probably have plenty of opinions, but we're going to go with some wheels we've seen in person and have spent some time with. ENVE's SES 5.6 offers a great balance between aerodynamics, lightweight, and incredible stiffness. ENVE is the official wheel supplier for a WorldTour team already, Team Dimension Data, and the team tends to use similar depths on their rim brake bikes much of the year. The 5.6 would have done us pretty darn well at Paris-Roubaix, where every team, by our count, was on tubulars. We think tubeless clinchers are finally ready for the big stage. 

Cockpit Bits
We'll leave ENVE to the wheels and select some other stuff for the cockpit. Since it's Kona, since it's Central District, and since we love the stuff, we're going for Thomson. We're going with the Masterpiece post, which comes in at just 158 grams. That's about the same as most carbon posts, and less than many, and with so much suppleness in the frame, we can afford a little stiffness in the post. We'll pair that with a 100mm X2 stem, Thomson seat collar, and our favorite drop bars, the Thomson KFC. Yep, we're going carbon on the bars, because they're light, tough, and Katie F'n Compton is a living legend. 

Saddle
This one is tough, but we'll stick with what we know. Sure, it's not a 'road' seat, but if your butt is on it and you're on pavement, voila, now it's a road seat. We're talking about the WTB Volt. Versions of this saddle come branded or unbranded on all sorts of Konas, and we always tell riders to give it a week, even if they don't like it at first. Almost all of them end up sticking with it, and some even upgrade to carbon or titanium railed models down the line. 

Tires
Since we're kind of building this for the cobbles, we're going to give it some rubber to match. Kona nails it with the stock build, actually, with the 2017 Roadhouse coming with our pick, the Schwalbe S-Ones. It's a perfect tire for someone looking to do a bit of everything. It has the same dimpled patterned as its wider brother, the G-One, but slots in between the widest Pro One (a 28) and that G-One, which comes in a 35. At 30, it's a great width for gravel and pavement, and we've ridden it as low as 40psi on loose, sandy gravel and still felt like it was floating over the top. 

Drivetrain
It's 2017, folks. If we're making a rocket ship, we're making it with the best electronics possible, and we have to give SRAM eTap a shot. The wireless components group may not be quite as crisp as Shimano Durace Ace Di2, but the difference in minimal, and with their Hydro levers now available, we love the clean look. For Paris-Roubaix, we're going for a 52/36 with an 11-25 cassette. There's nary a hill between Compiegne and Roubaix, and of course we want something for the sprint on the velodrome...right?

Finishing Touches
We'll opt for Shimano Dura Ace pedals (taped over, because it's a SRAM drivetrain), Elite Ciussi bottle cages, ZIPP Service Course tape (single-wrapped), and a Quarq power meter, just to have something to tell us how hard Paris-Roubaix is. 

Alright, your turn! What's your build on the 2017 Kona Roadhouse?

 

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